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12 Reasons to Live in Eretz Yisrael (Tikkun for Sin of the Spies)

I saw this on Israel National News:
"(This coming Shabbat, the Torah portion , Shelach, that recalls the sin of the spies, is read. These were the 12 men that Moshe sent to scout out the Land of Israel before entering. When they returned, their reports were distorted and negative and caused a 40 year delay before the Children of Israel could enter.

Today despite the challenges that come with living in Israel, we are witness to all that is good and special about living here and it is in our ability to tell our family, friends and neighbors abroad what those things are.

Nefesh B'Nefesh is initiating a simple project this week called "12 to 12". We are asking every Oleh to compose a list of 12 great things you appreciate and love about living in Israel and email your message to 12 (or more) friends abroad.

If you send this out to your friends, please CC 12to12@nbn.org.il when you send it out.

Please send out your letter before Friday June 8.


12 Things I love about living in Eretz Yisrael:
  1. Taking part in the Redemption of the Jewish People rather than sitting on the side lines
  2. "There is no Torah like the Torah of Eretz Yisrael and no wisdom like the wisdom of Eretz Yisrael."
  3. Meaningful prayer with the ancient Nusach of Eretz Yisrael
  4. Monthly ascents to Har HaBayit
  5. Learning Talmud Yerushalmi--and seeing its relevance
  6. Raising children who speak the language of our forefathers (more or less)
  7. The Jewish holidays are the national holidays
  8. The food vendor on the train asked me if he can borrow my tfillin
  9. The sea is the color of techelet
  10. Too many good kosher restaurants to name
  11. Nesher malt
  12. That there are more than 12 reasons to live here

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