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The Sitra Achra Raises its Head...

Baruch HaShem Machon Shilo's psak has received wide coverage on Ynet in both Hebrew and English. (They are must-read articles in either language). I received an email that their website has received over 215,000 hits in March. Clearly, they have made their mark.

Some disagreements have been l'Shem Shamayim and with respect, while others have merely besmirched Rav Bar-Hayim.

To paraphrase another Rav:
If anyone knows anything about the Sitra Achra and how he works in this world, then he would also know that the controversy surrounding an issue is perhaps a clue that it is authentic.

For the Sitra Achra fights on behalf of two causes: in favor of that which distracts Jews away from Torah, and against that which will lead to the redemption of the Jewish people — the arrival of which means his own demise (Succah 52a).
And so Neturei Kitniyos was born... fighting for shtuth and hiding the truth.


Anonymous said…
Great news that that Rav Bar Hayim and his coragous psak halacha recieved media attention.
I think he needs more Hebrew coverage. It needs to make newspapers like Makor Rishon and Hatzofe so the large Dati Leumi public will hear about this.
I think many of them will agree and will rely on this psak and when they see it.
Also Arutz7 in Hebrew would be good.

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